post-title New policy regarding introduction of peanuts in high-risk infants 2015-09-29 23:26:26 yes no Posted by

New policy regarding introduction of peanuts in high-risk infants

By: Dr. Grace Ryu Many of you may have heard about the groundbreaking study in New England Journal of Medicine early this year.  The results of the Immune Tolerance Network’s “Learning Early About Peanut” (LEAP study) demonstrated support for early, rather that delayed, introduction of peanut in high-risk infants.  This early introduction prevents the subsequent […]

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By: Dr. Grace Ryu

Many of you may have heard about the groundbreaking study in New England Journal of Medicine early this year.  The results of the Immune Tolerance Network’s “Learning Early About Peanut” (LEAP study) demonstrated support for early, rather that delayed, introduction of peanut in high-risk infants.  This early introduction prevents the subsequent development of peanut allergy. Based on this study published in February the American Academy of Pediatrics, American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology and American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology have endorsed and accepted a policy regarding Early Introduction and the Prevention of Peanut allergy in High-risk Infants.

  • Healthcare providers should recommend introducing peanut-containing products into the diet of high-risk infants early on in life, between 4-11months of age. Not doing this may be associated with an increased risk of developing peanut allergy.
  • Infants with early-onset atopic (allergic) disease, such as eczema or egg allergy in the first 4-6 months of life may benefit from evaluation by an allergist. The evaluation may consist of performing peanut skin testing. If positive the allergist may perform an in-office peanut ingestion challenge if appropriate after discussion with the family.

This is an important policy since the study showed that 17% of the children that avoided peanut developed peanut allergy by 5 years of age.  In the group that introduced peanut early only 3% developed peanut allergy by age 5.

Talk to your primary care or allergist today about the new guidelines.

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