post-title New Therapies for a New Year 2016-12-27 11:06:53 yes no Posted by

New Therapies for a New Year

Research into the ways the immune system functions in allergic disease has yielded several new therapies for allergies and asthma and eczema. Some of these biologic therapies are being used presently at Midwest Allergy to treat specific patients with asthma and other conditions.   Nucala (mepolizumab) and Cinqair (reslizumab) are both humanized monoclonal antibodies that […]

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Research into the ways the immune system functions in allergic disease has yielded several new therapies for allergies and asthma and eczema. Some of these biologic therapies are being used presently at Midwest Allergy to treat specific patients with asthma and other conditions.

 

Nucala (mepolizumab) and Cinqair (reslizumab) are both humanized monoclonal antibodies that block interleukin 5 (IL-5).  IL-5 is involved in the regulation of eosinophils in the blood and tissue. Eosinophils in lung tissue are responsible for the airway inflammation in asthma. These new products reduce eosinophils in the tissue and are potent medications for asthma control.  Patients with severe asthma and elevated eosinophils are good candidates for these therapies.

 

Lebrikizumab is a new potential medication that also may be used to treat severe asthma. Lebrikizumab is a human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-13.  IL-13, like IL-5 increases eosinophils and is active in other forms of inflammation. This therapy is still be used in clinical research trials.

 

Eczema patients may also have a new medication on the horizon, Dupilumab. Dupilumab is a human monoclonal antibody that inhibits IL-4 and IL-13 activity and reduces inflammation.  Dupilumab has shown dramatic improvement in moderate to severe eczema patients.   The FDA is expected to rule on Dupilumab’s approval in spring of 2017.  In addition to eczema Dupilumab has shown to reduce nasal polyps and sinusitis symptoms.  Also asthma patients in additional studies showed improvements in lung function tests and symptoms.

 

Finally research in mice suggests that it may be possible to transfer a gene that produces human anti-IgE in order to protect against anaphylaxis.  Scientists created a mouse model with peanut allergy and then transferred the human anti-IgE gene to the allergic mice. The gene vector allowed the mice to be protected when challenged with peanut.  The gene vector produces human anti-IgE, which is known as Xolair. Xolair is a biologic treatment used for asthma and urticaria.  It has also been shown to protect patients from anaphylaxis under certain conditions.  This gene treatment allowed the mice to make their own Xolair. The mice continued to make Xolair for the 5 weeks of the study and their protection against peanut reaction continued as well.   Much more research must be completed before this therapy could be useful for humans, but this study suggests a totally new way to think about treatment for food allergy.

 

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